News

The Royal Albert Dock Liverpool welcomes a very special guest

06th February, 2019

In recognition of our new Royal status, we’re welcoming back a very special visitor to the Royal Albert Dock Liverpool, on Tuesday 12 February. HRH the Prince of Wales will be making an official visit to meet the Dock’s stakeholders, local businesses and to take a special tour of the International Slavery Museum, before unveiling a new plaque in recognition of his visit, and of the Dock’s Royal status.
Royal status was granted by Her Majesty The Queen in April 2018, recognising the importance of the Dock both for its historical and architectural significance and its place within Liverpool’s past and future.


As part of the Prince’s official visit, he will be meeting some of the people, businesses and organisations that work day-to-day within the Dock’s Grade I listed walls. After meeting some of the Aberdeen Standard leaseholders, the Prince will meet founders of the Leather Satchel Co., Keith and Gail Hanshaw; illustrator and founder of the Nest, Katherine Caldwell; Peter and Elaine Kinsella, founders of Lunyalita; and a raft of other businesses, bars and restaurants, including What’s Cooking? and the Peaberry Coffee House.

The Prince will also be meeting with residents of the Dock, and representatives of the Royal Albert Dock Liverpool Charitable Foundation, which aims at providing other charities and communities unique access to the Dock for the benefit of the Liverpool City Region population.

During his visit, the Prince will take a special tour of the International Slavery Museum – the only national museum in the world to cover the transatlantic slave trade and its legacies – where he will see how the museum explores the history of slavery, while also addressing human rights issues.

The International Slavery Museum

“It’s an honour to welcome His Royal Highness, The Prince of Wales to the International Slavery Museum, to see our thought-provoking collections and displays, and to meet both staff and community stakeholders, who make the museum such a success,” 


“The International Slavery Museum not only highlights Liverpool and Britain’s role in the transatlantic slave trade and its legacies, but we also focus and shine a much-needed light on issues such as modern slavery, human trafficking and other current human rights abuses. This makes the museum quite unique, and as such we look forward to discussing our work and our very exciting future expansion plans with The Prince of Wales.”

Dr Richard Benjamin, head of the International Slavery Museum.

1988

This isn’t the Prince’s first visit to the iconic Liverpool location; his last visit to the Albert Dock was in 1988, where he reopened the regenerated Dock after years of decline and near demolition. His visit followed in the Royal footsteps of Prince Albert, who opened first opened the Dock in 1846.

“The Dock has had a long relationship with the Royal Family since its opening, and during some of its landmark moments,” 


“We look forward to welcoming His Royal Highness back after 30 years to show how far we have progressed and see first-hand the changes that are being made in preparation for our 175th anniversary in 2021, when we will encourage the entire city region to celebrate with us.”

Sue Grindrod, chief executive of the Royal Albert Dock Liverpool.